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fighting ships of the world

UNITED STATES NAVY (UNITED STATES OF AMERICA)

CRUISERS

ST. LOUIS armoured cruisers (1905-1906)

St. Louis 1906

No Name Builder Laid down Launched Comm Fate
C20, 7/1920- CA18 St. Louis Neafie & Levy, Philadelphia 31/7/1902 6/5/1905 18/8/1906 stricken 3/1930
C21 Milwaukee Union Iron Wks, San Francisco 30/7/1902 10/9/1904 11/5/1906 wrecked 13/1/1917
C22, 7/1920- CA19 Charleston Newport News 30/1/1902 23/1/1904 17/10/1905 sold 3/1930
  

Displacement normal, t

9700

Displacement full, t

10839

Length, m

129.9

Breadth, m

20.1

Draught, m

6.86 mean

No of shafts

2

Machinery

VTE, 16 Babcock & Wilcox boilers

Power, h. p.

21000

Max speed, kts

22

Fuel, t

C20, 21: coal 1650

CA22: coal 1700

Endurance, nm(kts) 6200(10)
Armour, mm

Harvey steel - belt: 102, deck: 76 - 51, casemate: 102, CT: 127

Armament

C20, 22: 14 x 1 - 152/49 Mk VI, 18 x 1 - 76/50 Mk III/V/VI, 12 x 1 - 47/40-45 Driggs-Schroeder Mk I/II, 8 x 1 - 37/40 Driggs-Schroeder heavy Mk I

C21: 14 x 1 - 152/49 Mk VIII, 18 x 1 - 76/50 Mk III/V/VI, 12 x 1 - 47/40-45 Driggs-Schroeder Mk I/II, 8 x 1 - 37/40 Driggs-Schroeder heavy Mk I

Complement

673 - 767

Ship project history: Authorised under the Act of 7/6/1900. Not considered a good design. The 152mm guns were disposed with one forward and one aft in shields, four in upper deck casemates, and eight in the main deck battery, while 12 of the 76mm were also on the main deck.

Ship protection: 102mm main lower belt covered machinery only. Upper 102mm belt covered lower battery. Armoured deck over citadel was 51mm behind the belt at flat part and connected with lower belt edge by 76mm slopes. This deck was 76mm with 76mm slopes at ship ends. 4 152mm guns were protected by shields, others by 102mm upper belt and casemates.

Modernizations: 1914 - 1918, all: - 2 x 1 - 152/50, 14 x 1 - 76/50; + 2 x 1 - 76/52 Mk X

Naval service:  Milwaukee was stranded off California 13/1/1917 attempting to salve submarine H3. All attempts to salvage her have appeared unsuccessful and later wreck was broken in two in storm in November 1918.

Charleston

Ivan Gogin, 2014