home

fighting ships of the world

UNITED STATES NAVY (UNITED STATES OF AMERICA)

SUBMARINES

SEAWOLF nuclear powered submarine (1957)

Seawolf 1957

Seawolf 1963

No Name Yard No Builder Laid down Launched Comm Fate
SSN575 Seawolf 141 Electric Boat, Groton 15/9/1953 21/7/1955 30/3/1957 stricken 7/1987

 

Displacement standard, t

 

Displacement normal, t

3741 / 4287

Length, m

102.9

Breadth, m

8.40

Draught, m

6.70

No of shafts

2

Machinery

2 sets General Electric geared steam turbines, 1 Westinghouse SIR Mk II (re-designated S2G) nuclear reactor

Power, h. p.

15000

Max speed, kts

19 / 20+

Fuel, t

nuclear

Endurance, nm (kts) practically unlimited

Armament

6 - 533 Mk 51 TT (bow, 22)

Sensors

BPS-12 radar, BQS-4, BQR-4A sonars, BLR-1 ECM suite

Complement

105

Diving depth operational, m

210

   

Ship project history: Nautilus and Seawolf were  built under the FY52 programme, these were the prototype US nuclear submarines, Nautilus being by far the more successful of the two. Seawolf was designed around the S2G sodium-cooled reactor, intended as a back-up to the S2W, but abandoned because of operational problems and replaced by an S2Wa in 1959. From 1969 she has been used for research, with four bow thrusters above her pressure hull (two forward and two aft) for precise manoeuvring, and provision for a DSRV research vehicle to be mated to her aft. Seawolf also had the last conning tower in a US submarine, within her stepped fin, as later submarines have only a bridge access trunk in their fin.

    In 1991 it was reported that Seawolf had actually been used for intelligence-gathering, presumably launching a submersible (the thrusters would have been valuable for precise positioning).

Modernizations: (12/1958-9/1960, Electric Boat, Groton): S2G reactor was replaced by S2Wa (15000hp).

1960s: - BPS-12 radar, BLR-1 ECM suite; + BPS-15 radar, WLR-1 ECM suite

1969: - BQS-4 sonar; + provision for DSRV, SQS-51 sonar, 4 side-thruster fore and aft

Naval service: No significant events.

Seawolf 1977

Ivan Gogin, 2015