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fighting ships of the world

 

UNITED STATES NAVY (UNITED STATES OF AMERICA)

CAPITAL SHIPS & MONITORS

MAINE 1st class battleships (1902-1904)

Missouri 1908

No

Name

Builder

Laid down

Launched

Comm

Fate

BB10

Maine

Cramp, Philadelphia

15/2/1899

27/7/1901

29/12/1902

stricken 7/1921

BB11

Missouri

Newport News

7/2/1900

28/12/1901

1/12/1903

stricken 7/1921

BB12

Ohio

Union Iron Wks, San Francisco

22/4/1899

18/5/1901

4/10/1904

stricken 8/1922

  

Displacement normal, t

BB10: 12846

BB11: 12362

BB12: 12723

Displacement full, t

13700

Length, m

120.1

Breadth, m

22.0

Draught, m

BB10: 7.42

BB11: 7.24

BB12: 7.26

No of shafts

2

Machinery

BB10: VTE, 24 Niclausse boilers

BB11, 12: VTE, 12 Thornycroft boilers

Power, h. p.

16000

Max speed, kts

18

Fuel, t

BB10: coal 1867

BB11: coal 1837

BB12: coal 2150

Endurance, nm(kts)

5660(10)

BB12: 6560(10)

Armour, mm

Krupp and Harvey steel - belt: 279 - 190, fore belt: 203 - 102, bulkheads: 229, deck: 102 - 64, barbettes: 305 - 203, turrets: 305 - 203, casemates: 152, CT: 254 - 51

Armament

2 x 2 - 305/40 Mk III, 16 x 1 - 152/49 Mk VI, 6 x 1 - 76/50 Mk III/V/VI, 8 x 1 - 47/40 Hotchkiss Mk I, 6 x 1 - 37/40 Hotchkiss/Driggs-Schroeder Mk I, 2 - 450 TT (beam, 6)

Complement

561

Ship project history: Authorised under the Act of 4/5/1898. This class broke away from previous designs, with the introduction of higher velocity 305mm guns and of KC armour which allowed thickness to be reduced. There was a forecastle deck to the mainmast, and freeboard forward was 5.9-6.1m. The turrets were electrically powered and of the 152mm guns ten were in an upper deck battery, two in upper deck casemates forward, and four in a forecastle deck battery. The 305mm gun axis heights above lwl were 8.2m forward and 5.7m aft and 152mm from 7.1m to 4.6m. The 305mm guns gave considerable trouble originally and had to be chase-hooped, while on 13/4/1904 there was a serious accident in Missouri's after turret when back-flame from the left gun caused three charges to ignite, the flame going straight down to the handing room. As a result modifications were made to US turrets which were tested in action in January 1918 when the British monitor Raglan, which had US turrets, was sunk by Sultan Selim (ex-Goeben). An explosion occurred in her turret but did not get below the gun-well floor, and Raglan sank with her magazines intact.

    These were the first 18kt US battleships, though Ohio only reached 17.82kts on trials, and had the reputation of being wet in bad weather.

Ship protection: Main belt had 2.29m height (0.99m over and 1.30m under waterline). It was connected with main gun barbettes by 229mm angled bulkheads. It was 279mm thick at upper part 1.30m in height, tapering to 190mm at lower edge between centerlines of barbettes. The belt abreast No.1 barbette was 216mm tapered to 149mm, later to the bow the side was protected by 102mm belt. There was 152mm upper belt, casemate was protected by 152mm armour. 64mm Nickel steel armoured deck between barbettes (it laid on 25mm deck of construction steel) was flat and connected with upper edge of main belt. At ship ends it was 64mm thick with 70mm slopes fore and 70mm with 102mm slopes aft. Turrets had 305mm faces, 203mm rears and 89mm crowns. Barbettes had 305mm protection (203mm at inner sides). CT had 254mm sides and 51mm roof.

Modernizations: 1909 - 1911, all: cage masts were installed.

1909 - 1911, Maine: Niclausse boilers were replaced by 12 Babcock & Wilcox.

1919, all: - 8 x1 - 152/49 (may be temporarily); + 2 x 1 - 76/52 Mk X

Naval service: All ships were stricken under the terms of Washington Treaty.

Maine 1902

Ivan Gogin, 2014