home

fighting ships of the world

IMPERIAL JAPANESE NAVY (JAPAN)

CRUISERS

NANIWA protected cruisers (1885 - 1886) 

Naniwa 1886

Name No Builder Laid down Launched Comp Fate
浪速 <Naniwa>   Armstrong, Elswick, UK 27/3/1884 18/3/1885 1/12/1885 wrecked 26/7/1912
高千穂 <Takachiho>   Armstrong, Elswick, UK 10/4/1884 16/5/1885 26/3/1886 sunk 17/10/1914

  

Displacement normal, t

3650

Displacement full, t

3708

Length, m

91.4 pp 97.5 oa

Breadth, m

14.0

Draught, m

6.10 full load

No of shafts

2

Machinery

HC, 6 cylindrical boilers

Power, h. p.

7000

Max speed, kts

18.5

Fuel, t

coal 800

Endurance, nm(kts)

9000(13)
Armour, mm deck: 76 - 51, barbettes: 51, shields: 38, CT: 38

Armament

Naniwa: 2 x 1 - 263/32 RKL/35 C/84, 6 x 1 - 149/32 RKL/35 C/80, 2 x 1 - 57/40 6pdr Hotchkiss Mk I, 10 x 4 - 25/60 Nordenfelt Mk I, 4 x 10 - 11.4/94, 4 - 350 TT (beam)

Takachiho: 2 x 1 - 263/32 RKL/35 C/84, 6 x 1 - 149/32 RKL/35 C/80, 2 x 1 - 47/40 3pdr Hotchkiss Mk I, 10 x 4 - 25/60 Nordenfelt Mk I, 4 x 10 - 11.4/94, 4 - 350 TT (beam)

Complement

325

Ship project history: The first protected cruisers built for the Japanese Navy, they were to an improved Esmeralda design prepared by Sir William White. They were completed with a cellular double bottom as an added protection against underwater damage from mine or grounding. The space could be flooded to adjust trim for the operation of the guns. Armour protection was much stronger than in Esmeralda and increased freeboard enabled the designer to arrange for the armoured deck to be placed above the waterline. Further protection was afforded by using the wing passages above and below the armoured deck abreast the machinery spaces as coal bunkers.

The armament was similar to Emeralda's with the 25t 26cm Krupp guns having a 240 arc of fire forward and aft about the keel line. Three 15cm/35 Krupp guns were mounted to port and starboard amidships, each commanding a field of fire of 130.

Ship protection: Protected deck consisted of two layers and had 51mm flat and 76mm slopes. Engine glacises also were 76mm-thick.

Modernizations: 1895-1896, Naniwa: fighting tops were lowered; - 6 x 1 - 149/32, 2 x 1 - 57/40, 10 x 4 - 25/50, 4 x 10 - 11.9/94; + 6 x 1 - 152/40 Armstrong W, 6 x 1 - 47/40 3pdr Hotchkiss Mk I

1895-1896, Takachiho: fighting tops were lowered; - 6 x 1 - 149/32, 10 x 4 - 25/50, 4 x 10 - 11.9/94; + 6 x 1 - 152/40 Armstrong W, 4 x 1 - 47/40 3pdr Hotchkiss Mk I

1900-1901, both: - 2 x 1 - 263/32; + 2 x 1 - 152/40 Armstrong W

1907, Takachiho: + mines

Naval service: Both ships served with distinction at the Battle of the Yalu and during the Russo-Japanese war. They were relegated to minor duties in 1907. Naniwa was wrecked off Uruppa Island, in the Kuriles, 26/7/1912. Takachiho was used as a minelayer since 1907 and was torpedoed and sunk by the German torpedo boat S90 while taking part in the attack on Tsing Tao 17/10/1914.

Takachiho

 

Ivan Gogin, 2014