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fighting ships of the world

INDONESIAN NAVY (INDONESIA)

CRUISERS

IRIAN light cruiser (1952/1963)

Irian 1965

Name No Yard No Builder Laid down Launched Comm Fate
Irian (ex-Ordzhonikidze) 201 600 194 Marti Yd, Leningrad, USSR 19/10/1949 17/9/1950 18/8/1952 // 24/1/1963 deleted 1972

 

Displacement standard, t

13600

Displacement full, t

16640

Length, m

210.0

Breadth, m

21.99

Draught, m

7.38

No of shafts

2

Machinery

TV-7 geared steam turbines, 6 KV-68 boilers

Power, h. p.

110000

Max speed, kts

32.7

Fuel, t

oil

Endurance, nm(kts)

5700(17)

Armour, mm

belt: 100 - 20, bulkheads: 120 - 100, deck: 50 - 20, turrets: 175, barbettes: 130, CT: 130

Armament

4 x 3 - 152/59 MK-5-bis, 6 x 2 - 100/70 SM-5-1, 16 x 2 - 37/70 V-11, 40 - 132 mines

Sensors

Rif, Giuys-2, 2x Neptun, 2x Zalp, 2x Yakor' radars, Tamir-5N sonar

Complement

1270

Ship project history: Sold to Indonesia in 1962 where she arrived in October 1962. Soviet Project 68bis. A second Soviet cruiser was to have been acquired by the end of 1963 according to Indonesian sources but was never delivered. There were also talks about an aircraft carrier built on the Sverdlov class hull but eventually nothing came out of it. Irian was modified to serve in the tropical climate but still was ill suited to the tasks of the Indonesian Navy.

Ship protection: Main 100mm belt (3.3m high) protected space between end barbettes and was closed by 120mm fore and 100mm aft bulkheads, there was thin 20mm belt between citadel and ship ends. 50mm flat main deck connected with upper edge of main belt, outside citadel it was 20mm. Steering gear compartment had 100mm sides and 20mm roof. CT had 130mm sides, 100mm roof and 30mm deck, secondary CT had 10mm protection. Main turrets had 175mm faces, 65mm sides, 60mm rears and 75mm roofs. Barbettes were protected by 130mm armour. Secondary turrets had 20mm faces, sides and rears, 10mm roofs and 20mm barbettes.

Modernizations: None.

Naval service: She was put on a disposal list in 1972 because of lack of spare parts needed to keep this impressive ship running.

Ivan Gogin, 2016