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fighting ships of the world

KAISERLICHE MARINE (GERMANY)

CAPITAL SHIPS

KAISER FRIEDRICH III battleships (1898-1902)

Kaiser Friedrich III 1903

Name Yard No Builder Laid down Launched Comp Fate
Kaiser Friedrich III 22 Wilhelmshaven KW 1895 1/7/1896 7/10/1898 prison ship 1916
Kaiser Wilhelm II 24 Wilhelmshaven KW 1896 14/9/1897 13/2/1900 floating HQ for C-in-C 1915
Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse 79 Germaniawerft, Kiel 1898 1/6/1899 5/5/1901 harbour ship 1916
Kaiser Karl der Grosse 136 Blohm & Voss, Hamburg 1898 18/10/1899 4/2/1902 prison ship 1916
Kaiser Barbarossa 640 Schichau, Danzig 1898 21/4/1900 10/6/1901 prison ship 1916

 

Displacement normal, t

11599

Displacement full, t

11785

Length, m

125.3 oa 120.9 wl

Breadth, m

20.4

Draught, m

8.25

No of shafts

3

Machinery

Kaiser Friedrich III: VTE, 4 Thornycroft + 8 cylindrical boilers

Kaiser Wilhelm II: VTE, 4 Marine + 8 cylindrical boilers

Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse: VTE, 4 Marine + 6 cylindrical boilers

Kaiser Barbarossa: VTE, 4 Thornycroft + 6 cylindrical boilers

Kaiser Karl der Grosse: VTE, 2 Marine + 2 doubled Marine + 6 cylindrical boilers

Power, h. p.

13000

Max speed, kts

17.5

Fuel, t

coal 1070

Endurance, nm(kts)

3420(10)

Armour, mm

belt: 300 - 100, deck: 65, main turrets: 250, secondary turrets: 150, gunshields: 70, casemates: 150, CT: 250 - 150

Armament

Kaiser Friedrich III, Kaiser Wilhelm II: 2 x 2 - 238/37 SK L/40 C/97, 18 x 1 - 150/37 SK L/40 C/97, 12 x 1 - 88/27 SK L/30 C/89, 12 x 1 - 7.9/80, 6 - 450 TT (1 bow, 2 beam, 1 stern)

Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse, Kaiser Barbarossa, Kaiser Karl der Grosse: 2 x 2 - 238/37 SK L/40 C/98, 18 x 1 - 150/37 SK L/40 C/97, 12 x 1 - 88/27 SK L/30 C/89, 12 x 1 - 7.9/80, 6 - 450 TT (1 bow, 2 beam, 1 stern)

Complement

651

Ship project history: This class of ships, all named after German Emperors, set the pattern for German pre-dreadnoughts with their comparatively light main armament, and their triple-screw installation. With these ships Germany was becoming a major naval power, but the design still compares unfavourably with that of British contemporaries. The secondary armament was heavy, with six of the forecastle deck guns being mounted in turrets instead of casemates.

Ship protection: Main belt had 300mm thickness between barbettes, tapering to 180mm at lower edge. Its thickness decreased to 150mm from fore barbette to stem (tapering to 100mm at lower edge), 200mm abreast aft barbette (tapering to 100mm at lower edge). After end of the waterline was unprotected. The belt had 250mm teak backing. Protective deck had 65mm thickness. Main gun turrets had 250mm sides and 50mm crowns, secondary turrets had 150mm sides, casemates had also 150mm protection, gunshields for 88mm guns had 70mm thickness. Main CT had 250mm sides and 30mm roof, aft CT had 150mm sides and 30mm roof.

Modernizations: 1909, Kaiser Friedrich III; 1910, Kaiser Wilhelm II, Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse, Kaiser Barbarossa: - 4 x 1 - 150/37, 12 x 1 - 7.9/80, 1 - 450 TT (stern); + 2 x 1 - 88/27 SK L/30 C/89 (Kaiser Karl der Grosse never was rebuilt).

Naval service: Between 1907 and 1910 these ships were reconstructed, with taller funnels, much of the superstructure cut down, and four of the 150mm guns and one of the torpedo tubes removed. The tertiary armament of 88mm guns was repositioned, several being placed on the upper deck, from which the 150mm had been taken, instead of their original much higher position, while their number was increased by two. Kaiser Wilhelm II, with a complement increased by 63, had been the fleet flagship until 1906. All were disarmed and used as hulks in 1916, being quite useless for war by that time.

 

Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse 1900

 

Ivan Gogin, 2014